Seat of Perception

Extra-cultural reviews by synaesthetes, symbolists, and strangers.

Krampus Around Town

And by “Town”, I mean the turn of the century….

For those who enjoy giving unusual cards for the holidays, here is a fine selection of festive Krampus images you might draw from.  Talk about great S&M remnants from pagan cultures. True, it might be a little early for this, but with Hallow’s Eve approaching, perhaps Krampus will have an extra chance to visit our streets once more.

*Krampus is the dark counterpart of Saint Nicholas, the traditional European gift-bringer who visits on his holy day of December 6th, a few weeks earlier than his offshoot Mr. Claus. Like his American descendant, the bishop-garbed St. Nicholas rewards good kids with gifts and treats; unlike the archetypal Santa, however, St. Nicholas never punishes naughty children, parceling out this task to a ghastly helper from below.

Do you have some naughty Krampus images we’ve missed?  Share them in the comments here or on our facebook page.

More information from wikipedia:

“Krampus is a mythical creature recognized in Alpine countries. According to legend, Krampus accompanies Saint Nicholas during the Christmas season, warning and punishing bad children, in contrast to St. Nicholas, who gives gifts to good children. When the Krampus finds a particularly naughty child, it stuffs the child in its sack and carries the frightened child away to its lair, presumably to devour for its Christmas dinner.

In the Alpine regions, Krampus is represented as a beast-like creature, generally demonic in appearance. The creature has roots in Germanic folklore. Traditionally young men dress up as the Krampus in Austria, southernBavariaSouth TyrolHungarySlovenia and Croatia during the first week of December, particularly on the evening of 5 December, and roam the streets frightening children with rusty chains and bells. Krampus is featured on holiday greeting cards called Krampuskarten. There are many names for Krampus, as well as many regional variations in portrayal and celebration.”

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